Event



China's Rise, International Relations Theory, and Security in a Maritime World

Brian Chao, Ph.D. candidate, Department of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania; Hyun-Binn Cho, Pre-doctoral fellow, Institute for Security and Conflict Studies, George Washington University, Ph.D. candidate, Department of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania.
| CSCC Conference Room, Fisher-Bennett 345

The rise of China is shifting the geopolitical focus of international relations to the Indo-Asia-Pacific—a predominantly maritime region. Challenges to security in the maritime domain, however, differ in important ways from security on land: artificial island-building in the South China Sea, fierce contestation over both sovereign and non-sovereign boundaries, and the risk of war between the United States and China to control Asia’s maritime commons, to name a few. Brian C. Chao and Hyun-Binn Cho assess whether our international relations theories and concepts, many of which were formulated based on land warfare, can adequately address the emerging challenges to security in the maritime domain.

Brian C. Chao is a Ph.D. candidate in political science at the University of Pennsylvania. He studies U.S. defense/foreign policy in the Indo-Asia-Pacific, naval power and geostrategy, and cross-Taiwan Strait relations.

Hyun-Binn Cho is a pre-doctoral fellow at the Institute for Security and Conflict Studies at George Washington University and a doctoral candidate in political science at the University of Pennsylvania. His research focuses on crisis escalation, Chinese foreign policy, and security in the Asia-Pacific.

Open to all, lunch provided.